NDMS

DIABETES FACTS

DIABETES IS AN EXPENSIVE DISEASE

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Diabetes is straining worldwide healthcare budgets.
In 2012, the estimated worldwide healthcare costs for the diagnosis and treatment of diabetes was at least $471 billion USD.

Source:
IDF Diabetes Atlas Update 2012. Available at: http://www.idf.org/diabetesatlas/5e/Update2012.
Diabetes is straining Canadian healthcare budgets.
The economic burden of diabetes in Canada is currently estimated to be about $12.2 billion, and is expected to increase to $16.9 billion by 2020. The direct costs of diabetes currently account for approximately 3.5% of public healthcare spending.

Source:
Canadian Diabetes Association. An economic tsunami, the cost of diabetes. 2009. Available at: http://www.diabetes.ca/get-involved/news/the-canadian-diabetes-associations-economic-report-makes-news-across-canada/
Accessed June 15, 2011

Healthcare costs for diabetes are projected to increase.
  • As the general population ages, the prevalence of diabetes and the associated costs are expected to increase.
  • As the population with diabetes ages, there will be an increase in long-term complications (e.g. cardiovascular disease, kidney disease) and associated costs to treat these complications (e.g. hospitalizations, dialysis).
Source: Public Health Agency of Canada. Diabetes in Canada: Facts and Figures from a Public Health Perspective. Ottawa, ON: 2011. Available at:http://www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/cd-mc/publications/diabetes-diabete/ Accessed January 3, 2012.
The cost of diabetes to the British Columbia economy is projected to rise from $1.3 billion in 2010 to $1.9 billion in 2020.
In British Columbia, there will be an estimated 62% increase in diabetes diagnoses between 2010 and 2020. With this, there will be a staggering increase in related costs. In 2010, the economic burden of diabetes in British Columbia was estimated to be $1.3 billion in 2010 (measured in 2009 dollars), with costs projected to increase by 41% to $1.9 billion by 2020. The direct costs of diabetes accounted for 21% of the total cost of the $1.3 billion in 2010, and were led by costs related to hospitalization.

Source:
Canadian Diabetes Association. The Cost of Diabetes in British Columbia. Available at: http://www.diabetes.ca/about-us/media-releases-entry/alarming-rise-in-diabetes-rates-threaten-british-columbias-economic-prosper/
Accessed June 15, 2011.
The cost of diabetes to the Alberta economy is projected to rise from $1.1 billion in 2010 to $1.6 billion in 2020.
In Alberta, there will be an estimated 67% increase in diabetes diagnoses between 2010 and 2020. With this, there will be a staggering increase in related costs. In 2010, the economic burden of diabetes in Alberta was estimated to be $1.1 billion in 2010 (measured in 2009 dollars), with costs expected to increase by 43% to $1.6 billion by 2020. The direct costs of diabetes accounted for 20% of the total cost of the $1.1 billion in 2010, and were led by costs related to hospitalization.

Source:
Canadian Diabetes Association. The Cost of Diabetes in Alberta. Available at: http://www.diabetes.ca/about-us/media-releases-entry/shocking-rise-in-diabetes-threatens-economic-prosperity-in-alberta/
Accessed June 15, 2011.
The cost of diabetes to the Ontario economy is projected to rise from $4.9 billion in 2010 to $7 billion in 2020.
In 2010, an estimated 1,169,000 people in Ontario had type 1 or type 2 diabetes (approximately 8.3% of the population). This number is expected to increase by 734,000 by 2020 to 1,903,000 (11.9% of the population). The economic burden of diabetes in Ontario is projected to increase by 42% over the next decade, from $4.9 billion in 2010 (measured in 2009 dollars) to $7.0 billion by 2020. In 2010, the direct costs of diabetes (22% of the total cost of the $4.9 billion) were led by hospitalization costs.

Source:
Canadian Diabetes Association. The Cost of Diabetes in Ontario. Available at: http://www.diabetes.ca/about-us/media-releases-entry/ontario-economic-prosperity-threatened-by-diabetes/
Accessed June 15, 2011.
The cost of diabetes in Nova Scotia is projected to rise from $383 million in 2010 to $483 million in 2020.
In 2010, an estimated 87,000 people in Nova Scotia had type 1 or type 2 diabetes (approximately 8.9% of the population). This number is expected to increase by 38,000 over the next decade to 125,000 (12.2% of the population). The economic burden of diabetes in Nova Scotia is projected to increase by 26% over the next decade, from $383 million in 2010 (measured in 2009 dollars) to $483 million by 2020. In 2010, the direct costs of diabetes (20% of the total cost of the $383 million) were led by hospitalization costs.

Source:
Canadian Diabetes Association. The Cost of Diabetes in Nova Scotia. Available at: http://www.diabetes.ca/about-us/media-releases-entry/dramatic-rise-in-diabetes-threatens-economic-prosperity-in-nova-scotia/
Accessed June 15, 2011.
The cost of diabetes in Newfoundland and Labrador is projected to rise from $254 million in 2010 to $322 million in 2020.
In 2010, an estimated 47,000 people in Newfoundland and Labrador had type 1 or type 2 diabetes (approximately 9.3% of the population). This number is projected to increase by 26,000 over the next decade to 73,000 people (14.4% of the population). The economic burden of diabetes in Newfoundland and Labrador is estimated to rise by 27% over the next decade, from $254 million in 2010 (measured in 2009 dollars) to $322 million by 2020. In 2010, the direct costs of diabetes (16% of the total cost of the $254 million) were led by hospitalization costs.

Source:
Canadian Diabetes Association. The Cost of Diabetes in Newfoundland and Labrador. Available at: http://www.diabetes.ca/about-us/media-releases-entry/diabetes-rates-in-newfoundland-and-labrador-highest-in-canada/
Accessed June 15, 2011.
Diabetes is straining American healthcare budgets.
  • In 2012, the total estimated cost of diagnosed diabetes was $245 billion $176 billion in direct medical costs and $69 billion in reduced productivity.
  • People with diagnosed diabetes have medical expenditures that are about 2.3 times higher than they would be in the absence of diabetes.
  • More than 1 in 5 healthcare dollars in the US is spent on people with diabetes.

  • Source:
    American Diabetes Association. Economic costs of diabetes in the U.S. in 2012. Diabetes Care. Ahead of print, March 6, 2013.
The World Health Organization estimates that from 2006-2015, China will lose $558 billion in foregone national income due to heart disease, stroke and diabetes alone.
Source: Diabetes Fact sheet N°312, November 2009. Available at: http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs312/en/index.html
Accessed June 15, 2011.

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Diabetes:
Did You Know…?

These facts paint a picture of the impact of diabetes on our health, healthcare system and economy.


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